Code re-use can be as bad as code duplicate

Code duplicate is one of the top evils in software development. But as strange as it may sound, code re-use can be a pain in the eyes too. Let me explain.

Our team works on intermediary layers of the product. Yes, sometimes horizontal slices are the way to go. Our product is about monitoring. It’s made up of a home-made database, an intermediate layer that defines and computes analytics, a framework to define specific applications, and the applications built on top of the platform. Our team works on the analytics. The main thing here is that we build frameworks. It’s actually what I always did. The problem with frameworks is that you never can anticipate every use case. They are here to provide tools, not end-user features.

For this kind of code, BDD-like tools are difficult to apply. BDD needs you to know precisely enough what you’re going for when you commit on a backlog item. And it requires to come up with a limited set of features to test. With such technical code, though, you can hardly state the new required behaviors as user stories. And the main thing you want is the whole to remain stable and efficient. Before validating new features, you want to test non regression. After a while, it becomes difficult to test it manually. And automated tests are not perfect by nature: the more stuff to test you embed in the automated test, the less maintainable and fast the campaign will be. You thus make trade offs, which test is all about. You can hardly test a re-used tool correctly.

We can even get down another step. A piece of code that is re-used by a flip load of modules is a nightmare to maintain because we never really know how it’s used. Even if you run a set of unit (or automated in any way) tests you rightfully trust, you are not sure the piece of code is used the way you test. It’s particularly true for code that’s been here for a while: when an additional module uses your code, it’a miracle if the guy implementing the calling code thinks about adding the automated test that guarantees the called code does what he expects. And please allow me to look somewhere else with a strange face if you tell me that 100% code coverage guarantees your test base is nuclear bomb proof.

A few years ago, when we were having regression issues on our code base, I was surprized to realize we wouldn’t have such problems if we had not shared a particular piece of code. It hurt a basic rule I had believed in for years. And then I realized I was only experiencing the need to think about another trade-off we always need to balance: sustainability vs sustainability.

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One comment

  1. Pingback: Why technical user stories are a dead-end « AAAgile

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